Nov 28, 2022  
2022-2023 College Catalog 
    
2022-2023 College Catalog

Appendices


 
 

Appendix 1

Alcohol and Other Drug Use

Policy

The South Carolina Technical College System prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of narcotics, drugs, other controlled substances or alcohol at the workplace and in the educational setting. Unlawful for these purposes means in violation of federal/state/local regulations, policy, procedures, rules, as well as legal statutes. Workplace means either on agency premises or while conducting agency business away from the agency premises. Educational setting includes both institutional premises or in approved educational sites off campus.

The South Carolina Technical College System recognizes that chemical dependency through use of controlled or uncontrolled substances, including alcohol, is a treatable illness. The agency supports and recommends employee and student rehabilitation and assistance programs and encourages employees and students to use such programs.

It is the policy of Tri-County Technical College to provide a drug free, healthful, safe and secure work and educational environment. Employees and students are required and expected to report to their work, class, or student activities in appropriate mental and physical condition to meet the requirements and expectations of their respective roles.  Tri-County Technical College will implement alcohol and other drug awareness programs for employees and students.

Student Alcohol and Other Drugs Procedure

Tri-County Technical College is committed to an ongoing student alcohol and other drug prevention program composed of both education and rehabilitation components as outlined below:

  • Education programs for students which ensure that students are aware of the health risks and effects of alcohol.
  • All aspects of counseling and referral will remain confidential unless the recipient gives written permission to do otherwise. This is in accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.
  • Compliance with the Drug Free Schools and Campus Act 34 CFR Part 86.
  • Compliance with the Omnibus Transportation Act 49 CFT Part 382.

The College will have an active, college-wide advisory committee on alcohol and other drug awareness issues. The goals of this committee will be to set forth guidelines for the student prevention program and to work with other individuals and agencies within the community to help make recommendations concerning specific implementation of the program. The committee will also gather feedback on the effectiveness of the program’s implementation.

Faculty and staff will make every effort to address any problem(s) a student may have as quickly, thoroughly, and discreetly as possible, so that disposition of any problem will be timely and in due process. To accomplish this objective, the following procedures will be observed:

  • In the case of possession, use, or distribution of alcohol or illegal drugs on campus, the student(s) will be referred to the Chief Student Services Officer for disciplinary action in accordance with the Student Code for South Carolina Technical Colleges as outlined below.  The General Provisions portion of the Student Code sets forth the rights and responsibilities of the individual student.

    SECTION I-PRINCIPLES: “Technical College students are members of both the community at large and the academic community. As members of the academic community, students are subject to the obligations which accrue to them by virtue of this membership. As members of the larger community of which the college is a part, students are entitled to all rights and protection accorded them by the laws of that community.

    By the same token, students are also subject to all laws, the enforcement of which is the responsibility of duly constituted authorities. When students violate laws, they may incur penalties prescribed by legal authorities. In such instance, college discipline will be initiated only when the presence of the student on campus will disrupt the educational process of the college. However, when a student’s violation of the law also adversely affects the college’s pursuit of its recognized educational objectives, the college may enforce its own regulations. When students violate college regulations, they are subject to disciplinary action by the college whether or not their conduct violates the law. If a student’s behavior simultaneously violates both college regulations and the law, the college may take disciplinary action independent of that taken by legal authorities.”

    SECTION II-INTERNAL SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEMS: “The college will seek to solve problems in internal procedures of due process. When necessary, off-campus law enforcement and judicial authorities may be involved.” The Student Code describes “unlawful acts.”

    SECTION III, F-6: “Possession, use, or distribution on campus of any narcotics, dangerous, or unlawful drugs as defined by the laws of the United States or the State of South Carolina.”

    SECTION III, F-7: “Possession, use or distribution on campus of any beverage containing alcohol.”

    SECTION III, F-8: “Violation of institutional policies while on campus or off campus when participating in a college sponsored activity.”

    SECTION III, F-9: “Violation of South Carolina and/or federal laws while on campus or off campus when participating in a college sponsored activity.”

    SECTION III, F-10: “Engaging in any activity which disrupts the educational process of the college, or adversely interferes with other normal functions and services.”

    In all cases where there is reasonable evidence that a student has been involved in such activities, the student(s) will be required to meet with the campus alcohol and other drug services liaison who will make recommendations deemed appropriate.

    Every student involved in an alcohol and other drug abuse incident on campus shall be referred to the alcohol and other drug services liaison. Failure to comply with the procedure and referral will be handled as a discipline violation through the Assistant Vice President for Student Support and Engagement.
     
  • If a student’s behavior or performance is questionably impaired by the use of alcohol or other drugs (suspected of being under the influence), faculty and staff may consult the alcohol and other drug services liaison for referral or contact the Assistant Vice President for Student Support and Engagement so that an inquiry can be made into the situation.
  • If a student becomes disruptive, campus police will be called immediately.
  • No student will be discriminated against for admissions purposes because of any prior conviction on any alcohol and other drug-related charge. However, any student identified as having been convicted will receive career counseling concerning the effects of that conviction on his/her career (i.e. licensing, certification, etc.).

Alcohol and Drug Laws

ALCOHOL PURCHASE ON BEHALF OF ONE WHO CANNOT LAWFULLY BUY: It is against the law to buy or give beer, wine, and/or alcohol to anyone who cannot buy it for themselves.

PENALTY: Fine up to $200 or confinement up to 30 days.

PURCHASE/POSSESSION BY A MINOR/ MISREPRESENTING AGE: It is against the law to drink or possess any form of alcoholic beverage if you are under the age of 21. It is also against the law to lie or furnish false information concerning age in order to obtain any form of alcoholic beverage.

PENALTY: Fine up to $200 for first offense.

TRANSFERENCE OF BEER OR WINE: It is against the law to serve beer or wine to anyone under the age of 21. This includes serving anyone in your home except your child or spouse.

PENALTY: Fine up to $200 or confinement up to 30 days.

DISORDERLY CONDUCT: Anyone found on any public highway or in any public place who is intoxicated or disorderly may be charged with disorderly conduct.

PENALTY: Fine up to $100 or confinement up to 30 days.

POSSESSION OF BEER, WINE, OR LIQUOR: It is against the law to possess beer, wine, or liquor if you are under the age of 21. This includes opened or unopened containers of alcoholic beverages in actual possession or in your immediate surroundings.

PENALTY: Fine up to $100 or confinement up to 30 days.

OPEN CONTAINER: It is against the law for anyone to have an open container of beer or wine in a moving vehicle.

PENALTY: Fine up to $100 or confinement up to 30 days.

SALE TO PERSON UNDER AGE: It is against the law to sell beer, ale, or wine to anyone under 21 years old.

PENALTY: Fine up to $200 or confinement up to 60 days.

Drugs

POSSESSION AND DISTRIBUTION OF DRUGS: It is illegal to have, to make, or to intend to distribute any controlled substance.

PENALTY: Varies depending upon the circumstances under which the arrest was made and the amount of drugs. Fines up to $200,000 and confinement up to 30 years.

POSSESSION OR SALE OF DRUG PARAPHERNALIA: It is illegal to possess drug paraphernalia; paraphernalia includes, but is not limited to such things as: roach clips, bong, carburetor.

PENALTY: Fine up to $500.

DISTRIBUTION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE CLOSE TO A SCHOOL: It is against the law to distribute, sell, make or have a controlled substance within a “specified” distance of a school.

PENALTY: Fine up to $10,000 and/or confinement up to 15 years.

S.C. Alcohol & Drug Laws

FELONY DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE (DUI): If you cause bodily harm or death to someone while under the influence of alcohol, drugs or any combination, you are guilty of a felony DUI.

PENALTY: For bodily harm, a mandatory fine up to $10,000 and mandatory confinement up to 10 years. For death, mandatory fine up to $25,000 and mandatory confinement up to 25 years.

DUI/CONSENT FOR TESTING: Anyone who drives on South Carolina highways automatically has given consent to a breathalyzer test if arrested. If you refuse to submit to a urine and/or blood test, your driver’s license will be suspended. There is no law that states you have to be given a driver’s license, provisional or temporary.

ALTERING AND FRAUDULENT USE OF LICENSE: It is against the law to lend, issue, sell or use your license or anyone’s license or a fictitious license (fake ID) for an unlawful purpose.

PENALTY: Fine up to $100 and/or confinement up to 30 days.

CONTRIBUTING TO THE DELINQUENCY OF A MINOR: It is against the law for any person over 18 to knowingly and willingly influence a minor to violate any law or municipal ordinance.

PENALTY: Fine up to $3,000 and/or confinement up to 3 years.

Controlled Substances Uses and Effects

The health risks of alcohol and drug use vary greatly from person to person, depending upon the substance used and the health of the user.

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–
    Controlled Substances   Street Name   Health Risks
Stimulants   Methamphetamines   Crank, Crystal, Ice, Glass   Brain damage, severe dental problems, death
    Cocaine   Big C, Aunt Nora, Aspirin   Chronic nosebleeds, high blood pressure, brain hemorrhage
—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–
Narcotics   Heroine   Smack, Big H, Tar   Collapsed veins, liver disease
            Pulmonary complications
    Morphine   M, Miss Emma, Monkey   Rapid addiction, respiratory arrest, death
    Codeine   Captain Cody, Schoolboy   Rapid addiction, respiratory arrest, death
—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–
Cannabis   Marijuana   Reefer, Weed, Grass, Dope   Addiction, respiratory infections, impaired memory
Hallucinogens   LSD   Acid, Blotter, Boomer   Loss of appetite, increased heart rate, flashbacks
Inhalants   Solvents, Gases, Propellants   Poppers, Snappers, Whippets   Lowers blood pressure, respiratory depression, death
Depressants   Barbiturates   Barbs, Reds, Phennies   Lowers blood pressure, respiratory depression, death
    Flunitrazepam   R2, Roche, Roofies   Vision disorder, memory loss while under the drug’s influence
—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–
Other Drugs   MDMA   Ecstasy, XTC, Disco Biscuit, X, E   Damage to neurons, involved in mood, thinking and judgment; liver and kidney failure; death
             

Alcohol: High-risk consumption may lead to cirrhosis of the liver, nervous and mental disorders, brain damage, gastrointestinal disorders, heart disease increased chance of cancer and alcoholism. The following impairment problems are also associated with high-risk consumption: drunk driving, unwanted sexual encounters, relationship problems, violence and poor academic performance.

Note: All the controlled substances listed above and on the previous page have a high psychological dependence.

Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD) Advisory Committee 2006-2008, Resources used: highereducationcenter.org and dea.gov

Wellness Programs

For enrolled students, Wellness Programs is your link to alcohol and other drug prevention related services available on campus and in the community.

Services provided by the staff may include educational presentations, referral to other agencies, awareness events, and information dissemination. For more information, contact Wellness Programs at 864-646-1569.

Appendix 2

Statewide Agreement on Transfer and Articulation

Preface

On May 2, 1996, the Commission on Higher Education approved unanimously the statewide agreement on transfer and articulation. That policy follows this preface in the form of the Regulations and Procedures for Transfer. Minor changes have occurred in the document since its approval. These changes (e.g., the enhancement of the list of universally transferable courses at public institutions from 72 in 1996 to 74 in 1997 and 86 in 2002) are reflected in the document as it appears here.

The policy that was approved on May 2, 1996, also incorporated decisions made by the Commission in 1995 as part of the Commission’s implementation of the South Carolina School-to-Work Act. Although the text of the 1996 policy that follows makes reference to documents related to these decisions, these earlier documents have not been printed here since in some cases they are redundant and in other cases they were superseded by events or by the 1996 policy of the Commission. Copies of the documents approved in 1995 that were incorporated into the 1996 policy are, however, still available by contacting the Commission by mail, telephone, or fax at the addresses listed on the Home Page. Regulations and Procedures for Transfer in Public Two-Year and Public Four-Year Institutions in South Carolina As Mandated By ACT 137 of 1995.

Background

Section 10-C of the South Carolina School-to-Work Transition Act (1994) stipulates that the Council of College and University Presidents and the State Board for Technical and comprehensive Education, operating through the Commission on Higher Education, will develop better articulation of associate and baccalaureate degree programs. To comply with this requirement, the Commission upon the advice of the Council of Presidents established a Transfer Articulation Policy Committee composed of four-year institutions’ vice presidents for academic affairs and the Associate Director for Instruction of the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. The principal outcomes derived from the work of that committee and accepted by the Commission on Higher Education on July 6, 1995, were:

  • An expanded list of 86 courses which will transfer to four-year public institutions of South Carolina from the two-year public institutions;
  • A statewide policy document on good practices in transfer to be followed by all public institutions of higher education in the State of South Carolina, which was accepted in principle by the Advisory Committee on Academic Programs and the Commission; and
  • Six task forces on statewide transfer agreements, each based in a discipline or broad area of the baccalaureate curriculum.

In 1995, the General Assembly passed Act 137 which stipulated further that the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education “notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, will have the following additional duties and functions with regard to the various public institutions of higher education.” These duties and responsibilities include the Commission’s responsibility “to establish procedures for the transferability of courses at the undergraduate level between two-year and four-year institutions or schools.” This same provision is repeated in the legislation developed from the Report of the Joint Legislative Study Committee, which was formed by the General Assembly and signed by the Governor as Act 359 of 1996.

Act 137 directs the Commission to adopt procedures for the transfer of courses from all two-year public to all four-year public institutions of higher education in South Carolina. Proposed procedures are listed below. Unless otherwise stated, these procedures became effective immediately upon approval by the Commission and were to be fully implemented, unless otherwise stated, by September 1, 1997.

Statewide Articulation of 86 Courses

The Statewide Articulation Agreement of 86 courses approved by the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education for transfer from two-year to four-year public institutions will be applicable to all public institutions, including two-year institutions and institutions within the same system. In instances where an institution does not have synonymous courses to ones on this list, it will identify comparable courses or course categories for acceptance of general education courses on the statewide list.

Admissions Criteria, Course Grades, GPAs, Validations

All four-year public institutions will issue annually in August a transfer guide covering at least the following items:

  • The definition of a transfer student and requirements for admission both to the institution and, if more selective, requirements for admission to particular programs.
  • Limitations placed by the institution or its programs for acceptance of standardized examinations (e.g., SAT, ACT) taken more than a given time ago, for academic coursework taken elsewhere, for coursework repeated due to failure, for coursework taken at another institution while the student is academically suspended at his/her home institution, and so forth.
  • Institutional and, if more selective, programmatic maximums of course credits allowable in transfer.
  • Institutional procedures used to calculate student applicants’ GPAs for transfer admission. Such procedures will describe how nonstandard grades (withdrawal, failing, repeated course, etc.) are evaluated; and they will also describe whether all coursework taken prior to transfer or just coursework deemed appropriate to the student’s intended four-year program of study is calculated for purposes of admission to the institution and/or programmatic major.
  • Lists of all courses accepted from each technical college (including the 86 courses in the Statewide Articulation Agreement) and the course equivalencies (including “free elective” category) found at the home institution for the courses accepted.
  • Lists of all articulation agreements with any public South Carolina two-year or other institution of higher education, together with information about how interested parties can access these agreements.
  • Lists of the institution’s Transfer Officer(s) personnel together with telephone and fax numbers, office address, and e-mail address.
  • Institutional policies related to “academic bankruptcy” (i.e., removing an entire transcript or parts thereof from a failed or underachieving record after a period of years has passed) so that re-entry into the four-year institution with course credit earned in the interim elsewhere is done without regard to the student’s earlier record.
  • “Residency requirements” for the minimum number of hours required to be earned at the institution for the degree.

Coursework (individual courses, transfer blocks, statewide agreements) covered within these procedures will be transferable if the student has completed the coursework with a “C” grade (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or above, but transfer of grades does not relieve the student of the obligation to meet any GPA requirements or other admissions requirements of the institution or program to which application has been made.

  • Any four-year institution which has institutional or programmatic admissions requirements for transfer students with institutional grade point averages (GPAs) higher than 2.0 on a 4.0 scale will apply such entrance requirements equally to transfer students from regionally accredited South Carolina public institutions regardless of whether students are transferring from a four-year or two-year institution.
  • Any multi-campus institution or system will certify by letter to the Commission that all coursework at all of its campuses applicable to a particular degree program of study is fully acceptable in transfer to meet degree requirements in the same degree program at any other of its campuses.

Any coursework (individual courses, transfer blocks, statewide agreements) covered within these procedures will be transferable to any public institution without any additional fee and without any further encumbrance such as a “validation examination,” “placement examination/instrument,” “verification instrument,” or any other stricture, notwithstanding any institutional or system policy, procedure, or regulation to the contrary.

Related Reports and Statewide Documents

All applicable recommendations found in the Commission’s report to the General Assembly on the School-to-Work Act (approved by the Commission and transmitted to the General Assembly on July 6, 1995) are hereby incorporated into the procedures for transfer of coursework among two- and four-year institutions.

The policy paper entitled State Policy on Transfer and Articulation, as amended to reflect changes in the numbers of transfer blocks and other Commission action since July 6, 1995, is hereby adopted as the statewide policy for institutional good practice in the sending and receiving of all course credits to be transferred. (Contact the Division of Academic Affairs for copies of this report.)

Assurance of Quality

All claims from any public two- or four-year institution challenging the effective preparation of any other public institution’s coursework for transfer purposes will be evaluated and appropriate measures will be taken to reassure that the quality of the coursework has been reviewed and approved on a timely basis by sending and receiving institutions alike. This process of formal review will occur every four years through the staff of the Commission on Higher Education, beginning with the approval of these procedures.

Statewide Publication and Distribution of Information on Transfer

The staff of the Commission on Higher Education will print and distribute copies of these Procedures upon their acceptance by the Commission. The staff will also place this document and the Appendices on the Commission’s Home Page on the Internet under the title “Transfer Policies.”

By September 1 of each year, all public four-year institutions will place the following materials on their internet websites:

  • A copy of this entire document.
  • A copy of the institution’s transfer guide.

By September 1 of each year, the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education will place the following materials on its internet website:

  • A copy of this entire document.
  • Provide to the Commission staff in format suitable for placing on the Commission’s website a list of all articulation agreements that each of the sixteen technical colleges has with public and other four-year institutions of higher education, together with information about how interested parties can access those agreements.

Each two-year and four-year public institutional catalog will contain a section entitled “Transfer: State Policies and Procedures.” Such section at a minimum will:

  • Publish these procedures in their entirety (except Appendices)
  • Designate a chief Transfer Officer at the institution who will:

provide information and other appropriate support for students considering transfer and recent transfers

serve as a clearinghouse for information on issues of transfer in the State of South Carolina

provide definitive institutional rulings on transfer questions for the institution’s students under these procedures

work closely with feeder institutions to assure ease in transfer for their students

  • Designate other programmatic Transfer Officer(s) as the size of the institution and the variety of its programs might warrant
  • Refer interested parties to the institutional Transfer Guide
  • Refer interested parties to institutional and Commission on Higher Education’s websites for further information regarding transfer.

In recognition of its widespread acceptance and use throughout the United States, SPEEDE/EXPRESS should be adopted by all public institutions and systems as the standard for electronic transmission of all student transfer data.

In conjunction with the colleges and universities, develop and implement a statewide Transfer Equivalency Database at the earliest opportunity.

(As an electronic counseling guide, this computerized, on-line instrument will allow students and advisors to access all degree requirements for every major at every public four-year institution in South Carolina. Also, the Database will allow students to obtain a better understanding of institutional programs and program requirements and select their transfer courses accordingly, especially when the student knows the institution and the major to which he/she is transferring.)

Development of Common Course System

Adopt a common statewide course numbering system for common freshman and sophomore courses of the technical colleges, two-year regional campuses of the University of South Carolina, and the senior institutions.

Adopt common course titles and descriptions for common freshman and sophomore courses of the technical colleges, two-year regional campuses of the University of South Carolina, and the senior institutions. The Commission will convene statewide disciplinary groups to engage in formal dialogue for these purposes.

(A common course numbering system and common course titles and descriptions for lower-division coursework at all public institutions in the state can help reduce confusion among students about the equivalency of their two-year coursework with lower-division coursework at the four-year level. To this end, a common system leaves no doubt about the comparability of content, credit, and purpose among the lower-division courses at all public colleges and universities in South Carolina. It would also help eliminate institutional disagreement over the transferability of much lower-division coursework, thus clearing a path for easier movement between the technical colleges and senior institutions.)

Appendix 3

The Student Code for the South Carolina Technical College System

The Student Code for South Carolina Technical College System (SBCTE Procedure 3-2-106.1), sets forth the rights and responsibilities of the individual student, identifies behaviors that are not consistent with the values of college communities, and describes the procedures that will be followed to adjudicate cases of alleged misconduct, except cases of alleged acts of sexual violence and sexual harassment. Cases of alleged acts of sexual violence and sexual harassment will be adjudicated through SBTCE procedure 3-2-106.2 or SBTCE procedure 8-5-101.1. This Code applies to behavior on college property, at college-sponsored activities and events, and to off-campus behavior that adversely affects the college and/or the college community. The Code applies to all students.

View the full Student Code at  http://www.sctechsystem.com/faculty-and-staff/policies-and-procedures/procedures/3-2-106.1.pdf 
 

Appendix 4

Student Code Procedures for Addressing Alleged Acts of Sexual Harassment Under Title IX

Under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 1681) and its implementing regulations (34 C.F.R. 106), sexual harassment is a form of prohibited sex discrimination. Title IX provides that, “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.” The South Carolina Technical College System is committed to fostering an environment that is free from unlawful discrimination on the basis of sex, including sexual harassment and sexual assault. Any questions regarding Title IX may be referred to the college’s Title IX coordinator. Each college must prominently display the contact information required for the Title IX coordinator (name or title, telephone number, e-mail address, and office address) on its website, if any, and in each handbook, catalog, or publication that it makes available to persons entitled to a notification. In addition, colleges should include contact information for the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights.
    
The Student Code for the South Carolina Technical College System (SBTCE Procedure 3-2-106.1) sets forth the rights and responsibilities of the individual student, identifies behaviors that are not consistent with the values of college communities, and describes the procedures that will be followed to adjudicate cases of alleged misconduct. The Student Code for Addressing Alleged Acts of Sexual Harassment (SBTCE Procedure 3-2-106.2) applies to behavior or complaints alleging acts of sexual harassment on college property, or in an education program or activity. This Code does not apply to persons outside of the United States. In order to proceed through the sexual harassment grievance process detailed herein, a formal complaint must be filed with or by a Title IX coordinator and meet the following elements:
    

  1. The alleged activity falls within the definition of sexual harassment as defined in Section II (CC.);
  2. The alleged activity occurred within a college’s education program or activity; and
  3. The alleged activity occurred against a person physically located in the United States.

    

Complaints reported to the college’s Title IX coordinator which do not meet the above elements shall be adjudicated under the grievance process outlined in the Student Code for the South Carolina Technical College System (SBTCE Procedure 3-2-106.1). The Nondiscrimination, Anti-Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct procedure of the South Carolina Technical College System (SBTCE Procedure 8-5-101.1) shall apply in situations where complaints are made against employees of a college.
    
Any person may report sex discrimination, including sexual harassment (whether or not the person reporting is the person alleged to be the victim of conduct that could constitute sex discrimination or sexual harassment) to the Title IX Coordinator at any time, including non-business hours, via the phone number, e-mail address or office mailing address listed for the Title IX coordinator.
    
Irrespective of whether a report of sexual harassment is anonymous, a college with actual knowledge of sexual harassment or allegations of sexual harassment in the college’s education program or activity against a person in the United States must respond promptly in a manner that is not deliberately indifferent, meaning not clearly unreasonable in light of the known circumstances.
    
In some cases, campus authorities may become aware of allegations of sexual harassment via local law enforcement. These allegations may also be addressed by this Procedure. The State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education and its member colleges encourage the prompt reporting of sexual harassment to campus security and local law enforcement. The complainant may also file a criminal report regarding the alleged conduct. However, Title IX investigations are separate from criminal investigations. In some cases, colleges may need to temporarily delay the fact-finding portion of a Title IX investigation while law enforcement gathers evidence. Contact information for local law enforcement and campus security is available on the colleges’ websites.
    
Retaliatory acts, which may include giving students failing grades, preventing students from participating in school activities, and threatening expulsion against any individual who exercises his or her rights under Title IX are considered to be discrimination and are unlawful. Colleges are prohibited from intimidating, threatening, coercing, or discriminating against any individual for the purpose of interfering with any right or privilege secured by Title IX. 

View the full Student Code Procedures for Addressing Alleged Acts of Sexual Harassment Under Title IX here: http://www.sctechsystem.com/faculty-and-staff/policies-and-procedures/procedures/3-2-106.2.pdf 
 

Appendix 5

The Student Grievance Procedure for the South Carolina Technical College System

The purpose of the student grievance procedure is to provide a system to channel and resolve student complaints against a college employee concerning decisions made or actions taken. A decision or action can be grieved only if it involves a misapplication of a college’s policies,  procedures, or regulations, or a state or federal law. This procedure may not be used in the  following instances: (1) to grieve a claim against a college employee for any matter unrelated  to the employee’s role or position at the college; (2) for complaints or appeals of grades awarded  in a class or for an assignment, unless the complaint is based upon alleged discrimination on  the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, disability, genetic  information, gender, veteran status, pregnancy, childbirth, other categories protected by  applicable law or on the basis of alleged sexual harassment/violence; or (3) to grieve a decision for which other grievance or appeal procedures exist (e.g., appeal of a disciplinary case, a  residency appeal, a financial aid appeal, FERPA grievances, transfer credit evaluations). 

The student filing the grievance must meet the definition of a “student” at the time of the decision or action being grieved and must be the victim of the alleged mistreatment. A grievance cannot be filed on behalf of another person. 

View the full The Student Grievance Procedure for the South Carolina Technical College System here: http://www.sctechsystem.com/faculty-and-staff/policies-and-procedures/procedures/3-2-106.3.pdf 

Appendix 6

Service Animals

It is the policy of the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education that the Service Animal Procedure shall govern the presence of service animals on college campuses and protect the rights of individuals who require a service animal.

The South Carolina Technical College System is committed to providing equal access to employment and educational opportunities for persons with disabilities. In keeping with these commitments, service animals are permitted on college property for persons with disabilities in accordance with relevant state and federal laws and the requirements of this procedure.

Service animals are allowed to accompany their handlers at all times and in all facilities and programs on campus, except in areas where specifically prohibited due to health, environmental or safety hazards (e.g. laboratories, mechanical rooms, machine shops, custodial closets, and areas where there is a danger to the animal.) The College may not permit service animals when the animal poses a substantial and/or direct threat to health or safety or when the presence of the animal constitutes a fundamental alteration to the nature of the program or service. The College will make those determinations on a case-by-case basis in alignment with current state and federal laws.

View the Service Animal procedure here: https://www.sctechsystem.edu/faculty-and-staff/policies-and-procedures/procedures/3-2-107.1.pdf